UNV coordinates International Volunteer Day on 5 December every year to recognize and promote the tireless work, not just of UN Volunteers, but of volunteers across the globe. Every day, volunteers dedicate time and effort to ensure the inclusion of those often left behind, drive climate action and advance the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Volunteers and Cinema

Hundreds of community cinemas across the UK are volunteer-run, with people bringing their love of cinema and the audience experience to life in their communities. There are also many other independent venues that simply would not be able to provide the special and personal experiences they do without the support of volunteers. Thanks to all these brilliant people!

6 Steps to Volunteer Management Success | Leep NGO

Volunteers’ Week takes place 1 – 7 June every year. It’s a chance to say thank you for the contribution millions of volunteers make across the UK, particularly at this time when we’re relying even more on the goodwill of volunteers to support our communities.

The Week is open to anyone to take part – this can include carrying out an act of kindness, doing some volunteering or contributing to discussion. Find more information here.

The week is led in partnership by NCVOVolunteer ScotlandVolunteer Now (Northern Ireland) and Wales Council for Voluntary Action and supported by organisations across the UK.

Volunteers and Cinema

Hundreds of community cinemas across the UK are volunteer-run, with people bringing their love of cinema and the audience experience to life in their communities. There are also many other independent venues that simply would not be able to provide the special and personal experiences they do without the support of volunteers. Thanks to all these brilliant people!

6 Steps to Volunteer Management Success | Leep NGO

Children’s Mental Health Week

Children’s Mental Health Week shines a light on the importance of children and young people’s mental health, launched by Place2Be, who provide mental health support in UK schools. It takes place from 3rd -9th February 2020 and this years theme is “Find Your Brave.” You can find lots of resources to support work around this here.

Around three children in every primary school class has a mental health problem (1). In addition, many children and young people struggle with a range of challenges such as bullying or bereavement.

System Crasher

FAN New Releases supported 606 Distribution’s title System Crasher in 2020 – a portrayal of the life of chaotic 9-year-old Benni (Helena Zengel) who keeps getting expelled from one foster home after another due to her uncontrollable aggression.

Too young to be held in treatment programmes and too violent to stay in group homes, she is a ‘system crasher’ – the unofficial, controversial name given to children who slip through the cracks of the German Child Protective Services. A seed of hope appears as Benni is given an anger management trainer to help her.

The title will appeal to fans of European cinema, people interested in mental health, and young audiences. You may wish to consider screening the film, supported by The Association of Child Protection Professionals, in your cinema to explore issues raised by Children’s Mental Health Week. 

The film is available with English audio description and descriptive subtitles

Cinema and mental health

Often misrepresented, mental health stories on screen can add to stigma around mental health conditions. Taking opportunities to raise awareness, and supporting education, cinemas can screen films to broaden understanding about mental health experiences, and ignite important discussions about how we look after each other.

Screenings can be for a range of audiences, from children and young people themselves to parents, carers and professionals who work with young people. Find some ideas for film screenings and events relating to Children’s Mental Health Week on this page.

Cinema and wellbeing

The activity of visiting a cinema can be beneficial to wellbeing. You may wish to consider accessibility and support for a diverse range of audiences.

If you’re interested in running a relaxed screening, to help support audiences with additional needs in your cinema, find out more in our quick tips for running relaxed screenings. You may also find some transferable advice in our autism-friendly screenings guide. Ideally, consult with relevant groups in your area for advice and expertise on supporting audiences.

(1) NHS Digital (2018) ‘Mental Health of Children and Young People in England, 2017.” Available at: https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and information/publications/statistical/mental-health-of-children-and-young-people-in-england/2017/2017. Based on 12.8% of 5-19 year olds being identified as having a diagnosable mental health condition.                                                     

Mental Health for All by Involving All | Vikram Patel | TED Talks

Matinee

Project overview Why the project matters Matinée provides dementia friendly cinema screenings across Derbyshire for people living with memory challenges, their family and friends. People with a dementia are ‘at higher risk of social isolation through a loss of social networks/ social support… Social isolation… has been associated with the risk of developing dementia.” Reducing … More

Mental Health Awareness Week is an annual event when there is an opportunity for the whole of the UK to focus on achieving good mental health. The Mental Health Foundation started the event 21 years ago. The event has grown to become one of the biggest awareness weeks across the UK and globally.

Loneliness

Loneliness is affecting more and more of us in the UK and had a huge impact on our physical and mental health during the pandemic. Our connection to other people and our community is fundamental to protecting our mental health and we need to find better ways of tackling the epidemic of loneliness. We can all play a part in this.

Read more here.

Mental Health and Cinema

Mental Health Awareness Week shines a light on mental health experiences. Often misrepresented, mental health stories on screen can add to stigma around mental health conditions. films can also present opportunities to raise awareness, support education and broaden understanding about mental health experiences, and ignite important discussions about how we look after each other. Find some highlighted films and events on this page, along with resources to support the wellbeing of cinema audiences.

Online films

We have provided some links to some interesting films below. If you are a filmmaker who works with themes of mental health and have work online, for example on your website, YouTube or Vimeo, you can let us know about it by completing our contact form here.

Online cinema ideas

Online initiatives can help people and communities to connect and support people experiencing mental health problems. There are some resources included here for getting started with running events online. 

Could you:

  • set up a watch party and have a chat on Zoom/Skype after the film?
  • run an online drawing, poetry or drama workshop, using a film as a theme?
  • buddy up individuals to have a chat online each week about a short or feature film they’ve seen?

Film ideas and resources

Every Mind Matters Campaign
read more
Guide to Online Film Clubs
read more
Learn how to plan and run an online workshop
read more
Mental Health Foundation: Mental Health Awareness Week
read more
MHFA Mental Health Resources: Remote Working
read more
March Network: Creative Isolation
read more
Film + TV Charity: Mental Health Community
read more
Using film screenings to raise public awareness of mental health
read more
Into Film Resources: Mental Wellbeing
read more
5 Documentaries About Depression & Mental Health Conditions That Have Helped Move The Conversation Forward
read more
The State of Mental Health
read more
Scottish Mental Health Arts Festival
read more
Northern Ireland Mental Health Arts Festival
read more
Film: Final Ascent: The Legend Of Hamish McInnes (PG)
read more
Mind: Information and Support
read more
Minds on Film Index
read more
Mental health facts and statistics
read more
Film: The Hours (12)
read more
Film: Madeline's Madeline (15)
read more
11 Films For Teaching Children’s Mental Health Week
read more
BBC Teach: Mental Health and Wellbeing teaching resources
read more
Cinematic Representations of Mental Illness: Melancholia/ The Girl on the Train / Three Colours: Blue
read more
Mental Health Toolkit for Employers
read more
Black and Minority Ethnic communities faced with double the levels of discrimination
read more
YoungMinds: Fighting for young people's mental health
read more
Film: Irene's Ghost (PG)
read more
BFI Player FREE archive film: A Modern Guide to Health
read more
Film: Eighth Grade (15)
read more
Into Film Resources: Mental Wellbeing
read more
Whole Picture Programme - Pioneering action for better mental health
read more
Film report - Screening madness: A century of negative movie stereotypes of mental illness
read more

Mental Health for All by Involving All | Vikram Patel | TED Talks

MHFA: Supporting your mental health while working from home

2680 out of 7000 languages spoken in the world are endangered. Only a few hundred languages have genuinely been given a place in education systems and the public domain, and less than a hundred are used in the digital world.

International Mother Language Day has been observed every year since February 2000 to promote linguistic and cultural diversity and multilingualism. In 2019, the United Nations declared The Year of Indigenous Languages (IY2019) to raise awareness and recognise the important cultural value that they bring to our world.

The UN has proclaimed 2022-2032 the International Decade of Indigenous Languages to draw global attention on the critical situation of many indigenous languages.

This is a great time to focus on planning screenings of films not in the English language, learn about the challenges Indigenous languages face by connecting people through language and culture through film.

World Mental Health Day shines a light on mental health experiences.

Now, more than ever, we must recognise the importance of mental health, how it is intrinsically connected to our physical health, and how we can care for ourselves and each other, support community, sensitivity and share experiences and offer solidarity.

In 2020, The World Health Organisation, United for Global Mental Health and the World Federation for Mental Health issued a press release calling for greater recognition of the need for support services, citing:

“Mental health is one of the most neglected areas of public health. Close to 1 billion people are living with a mental disorder, 3 million people die every year from the harmful use of alcohol and one person dies every 40 seconds by suicide. And now, billions of people around the world have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, which is having a further impact on people’s mental health.

“Yet, relatively few people around the world have access to quality mental health services. In low- and middle-income countries, more than 75% of people with mental, neurological and substance use disorders receive no treatment for their condition at all. Furthermore, stigma, discrimination, punitive legislation and human rights abuses are still widespread.”

Often misrepresented, mental health stories on screen can add to stigma around mental health conditions. Taking opportunities to raise awareness, and supporting education, cinemas across the UK are screening films to broaden understanding about mental health experiences, and ignite important discussions about how we look after each other.